Epiphany

For a long part of my somewhat short life I believed I was stupid. Stupid because I didn’t measure up to what other people were good at. For instance, Sciences in High School: I even got pressured into taking Chemistry because my friends said it would be useful later on (what I found out ‘later on’: a total lie UNLESS you were going into the sciences). On the bright side I learned that I hated Chemistry, and that it was something that I didn’t like doing nor was it something that I excelled at.

Fast forward a couple years and I’m starting university. I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do, (even deciding between going to college first or university was hard). I somehow ended up getting into Communications and although I liked what I was doing, the same “Chemistry” incident that happened in high school also repeated itself in university. You see, at my university, the Business program is a dominant program on campus and many students in the business program give off the impression that they are better than everyone else and make yourself (me) feel like crap (after being there for a couple years, and getting to know the ‘business kids’, I know better and don’t hate them like I used to).

Getting back, at the time, although I liked what I was learning, I felt that the skills that I was learning in Communications were irrelevant compared to Business and wanted to acquire those skills to be more rounded when I would graduate. However when I began to take those courses I felt like I had to work 10x as hard as everyone else and it definitely did not come naturally. I began to feel that if only I studied harder, was smarter that I would be a smart ‘Business Kid’ and not be an outsider anymore.

Recently, I started a new job working at a Technology Company handling their social media and branding. Additional duties include bookkeeping which doesn’t come naturally to me. However after my first day on the job of doing payroll, invoices and reimbursements was that ‘yes, I don’t necessarily love this stuff, but that doesn’t mean that the skills that I’m acquiring aren’t useful. And it definitely doesn’t mean that I’m stupid.’ It just means that there are areas that I may have to work harder in to grow.

I would like to leave you with one last food for thought: If you can’t believe in yourself, who can? I realized through my journey in life so far that life is short and you can’t be good at everything but to focus on the positives on what you’re good at and run from there. Hope my words of wisdom helped anyone who has ever felt stupid at anytime of your life and to push on to find something that you are proud and enjoy doing.

❤ ❤

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Leap of Faith

Contradictory to the name of this blog, there appears to be decent human beings that go to university. Maybe that’s because they are first years that are naive to the new excitement and ‘finding yourself.’ But who can stop that naivety when it’s been plunged and soaked through every pore since we’ve gotten our first locker. Sadly I see that the school and institutional system hollows out the creativity that we were born with and turns us into ‘pod robots’ as E. Lockhart’s Ruby Oliver likes to refer. One could argue that in university that you are given the choice to pursue what you love and want to do – business, communications, science, the arts, English. However what if (like the majority of us) haven’t a clue what we want to do with the rest of our lives. Why is it that we are always being pushed in the direction of university? Why can’t they encourage other options like travelling or working? 

In my opinion it could be that it all comes down to the system. I could argue that the system is corrupt, that universities are run by mean, evil people who are only out to make money and do not care about the people who go to the school. 

The university could come back stating, how they do care about the students – provide more than enough chances to succeed (academic probation), counselling, student learning commons. But isn’t this all in order to keep students coming back to learn, and to keep the university full of money?

Although a majority of this blog post has been pessimistic, one concluding thought I’d like to leave you all with is: why are you going to university? The reality is university degrees are being pumped out like they are going out of business.

My advice to any future student at university – ask yourself why you’re there, keep asking yourself that. Remember that now a days the most important thing an employer above all else is experience. And last as cliche as it sounds, do what you love to do.

To the lovely first year students I met on my second day, you are wonderful people and I hope you enjoy the tough road ahead!